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mistur niceguy's Posts

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Thread [Gaming] Powerline adapters vs WiFi Extender?
That's the beauty of MoCA: it's designed to share the same coax cable with cable TV and DOCIS internet service. MoCA Ethernet signaling operates in a frequency range outside of DOCSIS and cable TV (but some satellite TV overlaps, preventing you from sharing coax with MoCA and some satellite TV service). There's even some DOCSIS gateways that use a single coax port for both DOCSIS internet service and MoCA signaling. So a typical cabling layout in your living room would be: Wall --> MoCA adapter --> Cable TV set top box And at your cable modem (assuming it's not a gateway that already has MoCA support): Wall --> MoCA adapter --> DOCSIS modem
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(25152098)

Thread [Gaming] Powerline adapters vs WiFi Extender?
If you do end up going the route of purchasing a different router in the future, I'd recommend looking at models that support DFS channels for 5GHz. You might be able to catch a good holiday deal this year on a Netgear R7800, which supports DFS. Assuming that you're living in a dorm or apartment environment, there's going to be a lot over overlap between wireless networks, even for 5GHz. That's where DFS makes a big difference. DFS support on a wireless router allows it to operate in channels that are prioritized for non-WiFi communications, typically weather radar. So as long as you aren't near an airport/airfield, there will be a large chunk of wireless spectrum in 5GHz that is often wide open for DFS-certified devices to operate in. Do note that not all wireless clients support connecting to 5GHz DFS channels, so you would want to see if you can find information on the wireless chipset in your PC to confirm it supports connecting to DFS channels.
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(25151627)

Thread [Gaming] Powerline adapters vs WiFi Extender?
You can actually run them now, assuming you have cable TV service and not satellite. MoCA runs Ethernet signals at a frequency outside of the range used by cable TV and DOCSIS internet service, so it can share the same cabling (satellite TV will often use frequencies that MoCA uses, causing conflicts). If you have a DOCSIS gateway supplied by your ISP, it could already have MoCA capabilities built-in. Take a look at the coax input port on the gateway and see if it has a MoCA label. If so, you should only need one MoCA adapter to run Ethernet to another room that shares the same coax wiring. If you look at most MoCA Ethernet adapters, they'll have a splitter built into them, but DOCSIS gateways with MoCA support often use the same coax port for both DOCSIS signaling and MoCA. A typical cabling layout using MoCA adapters would look like this: Wall --> MoCA Adapter --> Cable Modem or Cable TV Set Top Box You'll just want to make sure that any splitters you have in between the MoCA adapters support MoCA frequencies (Amazon has them for a good price), and that you put a Point of Entry MoCA filter on the coax coming into your house. That will block MoCA signals from leaving your home, as well as prevent MoCA signals from other homes that didn't put a filter on from interfering with your adapters. I'm a big fan of MoCA Ethernet adapters. Many homes that don't have Cat5/6 cabling installed will often have coax cabling available in many rooms, especially in the living room next to the TV and any gaming consoles. It's a great option for a high quality wired connection for gaming. Powerline is a good option for some as well, but a key difference between the technologies is that Powerline relies on cabling that's capable of carrying a communications signal, versus MoCA leveraging cabling that's designed to carry a communications signal.
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(25132720)

Thread [Gaming] Powerline adapters vs WiFi Extender?
Here's an example product: Scanning ebay, there are some pre-owned/open box MoCA adapters that would fit into your price range, but feasibility would depend on how the coax cabling is configured in your building. Follow up question: are you currently using the 2.4GHz or 5GHz radio on your router? And what device are you connecting to it? Xbox One, PlayStation 4, or PC?
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(25129926)

Thread [Gaming] Powerline adapters vs WiFi Extender?
Any chance you have coax cable in both rooms? If so, MoCA adapters might be an option, but you’d want to put a filter upstream from those two rooms. If all of the rooms in the building feed into a main wiring closet, MoCA may not be an option.
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(22368032)

Thread Port Forwarding for PSN
UPnP is going to be the simplest way to have P2P connectivity work for games and chat. If you setup port forwarding, you'll want to put your PS4 on a static IP address to prevent it from moving to a new IP and requiring the forwarding rules to be reconfigured to point to the new internal address. Another option is port triggering, which is more automated than forwarding but isn't a feature that you'll see on all routers. Triggering works similar to forwarding, but instead of static rules mapping inbound traffic destined for specific ports to specific internal IP addresses, the router will dynamically create forwarding rules whenever it sees traffic matching the specific port being sent from an internal address. This allows for multiple devices in the home to have rules created dynamically by the router and typically doesn't require setting static IP addresses on your devices, but it only allows a single device to leverage the dynamic rules at any given point in time. And then there's the DMZ option. This will allow any unsolicited, inbound traffic to be forwarded to a specific internal address to work around P2P connection issues. One thing that I don't recall see being mentioned so far is that in addition to ports used by PlayStation for things like Party Chat, there are also some games that leverage P2P network architecture that will use additional network ports as well. So setting up port forwarding or port triggering configurations will require additional rules for some games that use their own network ports. If UPnP is working properly between the game and your router, those rules will be setup automatically. And placing the console in the DMZ should also work for those games. In short, UPnP is going to be the simplest method to enabling P2P communication for features like Party Chat and for games that use a P2P architecture. There are instances where routers may have a buggy UPnP implementation running, or have a version of UPnP installed that isn't backwards compatible with most current devices and results in NAT issues. In those instances, folks usually end up using either port forwarding, port triggering, or DMZ configurations to work around the problem. Port forwarding and port triggering are good workarounds, but you'll likely need to add additional rules depending on the games that you play. And putting the console in the DMZ is more of a catch all solution if none of the above methods work. Also note: many of these network features overlap with each other, so you'll want to make sure you only use one at a time, e.g. if you enable UPnP on your router, make sure to disable any DMZ, port forwarding, or port trigger rules.
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(22370429)

Thread Port Forwarding for PSN
Clarification: using a static IP isn't needed when using UPnP. DHCP + UPnP makes things more simple and automagic. As for using Google DNS servers, the easiest method would be to set that up on your router, versus having to go device-by-device configuring manual DNS settings to override what gets set via DHCP. How routers implement the alternate DNS configuration can differ, though. Some will just pass down the DNS server values to client devices via DHCP settings, while others will still point client devices to the router as a DNS relay and the router will start using the alternate DNS services rather than those passed down to it from your ISP. Also, there are other DNS services out there that you might also consider, such as OpenDNS or Cloudflare. And also be aware that if your ISP connection supports IPv6 that you may want to also configure the IPv6 addresses for the alternate DNS service (even though IPv6 DNS lookups can be issued to the DNS service via IPv4).